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veggieboy
05-14-2008, 01:26 AM
Okay... that is a pretty broad question, but it sums it all up. :)

I read about 3-5 books a week and they usually are Horror or Fantasy novels.:knockout: I also like Mysteries and Crime novels. I was introduced to reading at a very young age and it has been one of my favorite things to do pretty much all my life... so I am writing this for people to tell about their favorite book or books.

I would have to say that my favorite books would have to be ones written by Stephen King, but I cannot chose one. I like Carrie, The Shining, or The Pet Cemetery. I like some of his newer once, but one that I liked a lot would have to be Cell I have yet to read the The Dark Tower series (Gene is going to give me ****?)... but that is for horror novels.

I would have to say that I have a favorite book(s) for each genre...

For fantasy I would have to say The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien. The Lord of the Rings series were pretty good, but the hobbit is better. Of course another favorite for Fantasy novels would have to be the Harry Potter series. Right now I am reading Birthright (Diablo: The Sin War, Book 1). It is based off the video game and so far it is pretty good.

I also like to read poetry. Edgar Allan Poe is my all time favorite. Langston Hughes, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, E.E. Cummings, and Shel Silverstein are all tied for 2nd.

I remember reading the Fear Street series by R.L. Stine as a young teen and I have the whole series. Every now and then when I cannot sleep I pull one out and read one.

* The Wrong Number
* The New Year's Party
* The Mind Reader
* Wrong Number 2
* Truth or Dare
* Dead End
* I See You
* Final Grade
* Switched
* College Weekend
* The Stepsister 2
* What Holly Heard
* The Face
* Secret Admirer
* The Perfect Date
* The Confession
* The Boy Next Door
* Night Games
* Runaway
* Killer's Kiss
* All-Night Party
* The Rich Girl
* Cat
* Who Killed the Homecoming Queen?
* Into the Dark
* The Best Friend 2
* Trapped
* The Surprise Party
* The New Girl
* One Evil Summer



Thank you to Gene for making this Sub-Forum for me!!! I really appreciate it and I like that the administrators listen to the people in this online community. :clap: :clap: :clap:

First Thread!!!

Gene
05-14-2008, 01:29 AM
I've actually been reading Stephen King lately (the Gunslinger books). I was thinking of picking up Cell, I hear it's good. Would you recommend it?

Outside of King's books I really don't have a solid favorite. Though I recently read the Dragonlance Annotated Chronicles and enjoyed them greatly. I'm also fond of the Lord of the Rings books (even if they're a bit wordy). Outside of that I am fond of R.A. Salvatore's books, he does incredibly nifty combat scenes.

veggieboy
05-14-2008, 02:03 AM
was thinking of picking up Cell, I hear it's good. Would you recommend it?

Yes!!! It was very good and I think there is/going to be a movie...


His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman

The Golden Compass
The Subtle Knife
The Amber Spyglass

...and The Chronicles of Narnia by Clive Staples Lewis

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Prince Caspian
The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
The Silver Chair
The Horse and His Boy
The Magician's Nephew
The Last Battle

...were some favorites as a kid.

Fans of the series argue over the correct ordering of the books.
http://img169.imageshack.us/img169/1305/tconnw6.png

To make the case for his suggested order, Gresham quoted Lewis' reply to a letter from an American fan in 1957 who was having an argument with his mother about the order:

“I think I agree with your order [i.e. chronological] for reading the books more than with your mother’s. The series was not planned beforehand as she thinks. When I wrote The Lion I did not know I was going to write any more. Then I wrote P. Caspian as a sequel and still didn't think there would be any more, and when I had done The Voyage I felt quite sure it would be the last, but I found I was wrong. So perhaps it does not matter very much in which order anyone read them. I’m not even sure that all the others were written in the same order in which they were published.”

... but you know.


I also like books wrote by Ann Rice. You have to admit Interview with the Vampire was a pretty bad *** book. I do not like the newer vampire books, but the Twilight Series is growing very popular... I might read them.

Brappa
05-14-2008, 03:30 AM
I'm currently reading Anne Rice's Vampire Chronicles, I'm up to Pandora, I am loving them although I was less fond of Memnoch, The Devil.

I do like Lord of The Rings and The Hobbit, but they are not the best fantasy I have read. Steven Donaldson is better in my opinion. I haven't read all of the Thomas covenant trilogies, I can't actually remember where I am up to. I will start again at some time.

I also bought His Dark Materials trilogy, the only novels I have bought. Possibly my favourite books.

The Chronicles of Narnia are also good, until i realised that the whole thing is just a front for Christianity :D

I don't get enough time to read any more. I used to be able to go through a couple of books a week. but now I just barely read. :cry:

I want to get around to re-reading The Skylark series and Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.

My next series will be Diskworld, probably. I have heard so much about it that I have to read it.

tim
05-14-2008, 10:54 AM
I have a hard time reading. No attention span. There have been a few books that managed to hold my attention though. My favorites are The Hobbit and The Stand (Steven King). Weaveworld by Clive Barker was really cool too. I love all works by HP Lovecraft as well.

minisav
05-14-2008, 11:54 AM
Meh I'm so young so all mine you won't have read XD

The Boy Soldier series by Andy McNab is amazing along with my favourite series of books, the Cherub series by Robert Muchamore :)

Viper_Sweden
05-14-2008, 12:21 PM
I don't read much, some Conan and books on runemagic and sorcery is enough for me... ;)

ward_rb
05-14-2008, 12:40 PM
tolkien, salvatore, and lovecraft are some of my favorite authors.

also there used to be a series of books based on magic: the gathering that was pretty good. ive got the first 11 books, and now that i think about them i kinda want to re-read some of them again.

good omens by neil gaiman and terry pratchet

the hagakure

the book of five rings by miyamoto musashi

the rhapsody series by elizabeth haydon

wizards first rule series by terry goodkind

ive got three books of poetry by jim morrison

i also love manga. its too damn expensive though, so i just buy shonen jump (its like a magazine with 2-4 chapters of around 10 different manga's) every month. i have every issue so far.

golem
05-14-2008, 02:53 PM
tolkien, salvatore, and lovecraft are some of my favorite authors.

also there used to be a series of books based on magic: the gathering that was pretty good. ive got the first 11 books, and now that i think about them i kinda want to re-read some of them again.

good omens by neil gaiman and terry pratchet

the hagakure

the book of five rings by miyamoto musashi

the rhapsody series by elizabeth haydon

wizards first rule series by terry goodkind

ive got three books of poetry by jim morrison

i also love manga. its too damn expensive though, so i just buy shonen jump (its like a magazine with 2-4 chapters of around 10 different manga's) every month. i have every issue so far.

Hah.. I like your first few lines :D

Ok the question if favorite book so I was going to pick Good Omens as well.

But to be honest I have some authors I read almost all books by:
Terry Pratchett (discworl series)
Harry Turtledove (alternative history)
R.A. Salvatore (forgotten realms / Star Wars mainly but I also have his out back novels and crimson shadow series)
King of course (Favs are The Stand and Eyes of the Dragon)
Tom Clancy (I always see Harrison Ford as Ryan)
Last but certainly not least: Timothy Zahn (SF mainly Star Wars but also others, writes so you can't put the book away).

Actually there are more -> mainly forgotten realms and SW series
Oh and Harry Potter..
I feel i'm ignoring good books..

Comic's count as well? -> Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson and Dilbert by Scott Adams are high on the read and read again list.

well.. if you don't know what to read :D

veggieboy
05-14-2008, 03:44 PM
Steven Donaldson is better in my opinion.

By Steven Donaldson you mean Stephen R. Donaldson?...

The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever were okay, but The Gap Series was way better! They were very interesting and I couldn’t put them down…




I have a hard time reading. No attention span.

Yeah that kind of sucks… I was that way for a while, but Stephen King books are pretty good and so are fantasies… They always have a good storyline and I usually read those whenever I have free time.




Meh I'm so young so all mine you won't have read XD


When I was “younger” I liked to read books by Mortimer Adler and a few other authors of philosophy… but I lost interest in them.



books on runemagic and sorcery is enough for me... ;)

:lol: ... Yeah... they are kind "interesting".




tolkien, salvatore, and lovecraft are some of my favorite authors.

also there used to be a series of books based on magic: the gathering that was pretty good. ive got the first 11 books, and now that i think about them i kinda want to re-read some of them again.

good omens by neil gaiman and terry pratchet

the hagakure

the book of five rings by miyamoto musashi

the rhapsody series by elizabeth haydon

wizards first rule series by terry goodkind

ive got three books of poetry by jim morrison

i also love manga. its too damn expensive though, so i just buy shonen jump (its like a magazine with 2-4 chapters of around 10 different manga's) every month. i have every issue so far.

Magic The Gathering books are absolutely horrible and just plain… never mind… sorry.

I like the other books you listed. Wizards First Rule and The Rhapsody were my favorite out the ones you listed.

Yes manga books are a bit pricy. If you haven’t read the Death Note series or Bleach … you should. They are really good and probably the best in my opinion.




Terry Pratchett (discworl series)
Harry Turtledove (alternative history)
R.A. Salvatore (forgotten realms / Star Wars mainly but I also have his out back novels and crimson shadow series)
King of course (Favs are The Stand and Eyes of the Dragon)
Tom Clancy (I always see Harrison Ford as Ryan)
Last but certainly not least: Timothy Zahn (SF mainly Star Wars but also others, writes so you can't put the book away).


I could not get into the Tomy Clancy books. Stephen King's books are really good and I really cannot decide on a favorite, but The Stand was pretty good.
I have never read the Star Wars books... are they good?

Ivaron
05-14-2008, 06:17 PM
My next series will be Diskworld, probably. I have heard so much about it that I have to read it.
Heh, I read that series and I thought it was horrible. It was just way too wacky for my tastes.

wizards first rule series by terry goodkind
Meh. A friend of mine really loves that series. Personally, I think it's not interesting. I hate it when you look from the perspective of people I can't stand, and this series does that way too much :(

Magic The Gathering books are absolutely horrible and just plain… never mind… sorry.
I read one of those books, and I didn't think it was horrible, but it was very.. uninspired. And the fact that the magic in the books worked exactly like in the game, just really didn't work for me.

Also seen some people talk about Tolkien.. Well, I never read the Lord of the Rings, because I absolutely hated the Hobbit. Nothing exciting happened in that book, and the writing style was quite bad.
Also read a small part of the Silmarillion, but ... Well, that book is the devil. It's HORRIBLE. It's like reading the bible, only 10 times more boring and longwinded.

But enough whining 8b. My favorite series of books are those by Raymond E. Feist. Harry Potter is in second place :)
I have a love/hate relationship with the Wheel of Time series. I really liked the first book. But I hate Nynaeve and the fact that very few actually happens in each book after the first. Issues are unresolved, it takes 2-3 books for people to travel somewhere, etc, etc..
On the other hand, I really like the story it has, and Mat Cauthon is maybe my favorite fictional character ever. Rhand annoys me sometimes, being so stubborn and acting all tough, but he's also a sad and complex character.
I'm looking forward to the last book, because I want to know how it ends, and than I won't have to read that damn series anymore xD

GWarrior
05-14-2008, 06:43 PM
My favourite books to read are the Dragonlance saga , all 30 of them , Dune Series, the Gor series (Tarl Cabot) , the Riverworld series by Phililpe Jose Farmer , the skylark books by E.E. Doc Smith ,

and dare i say the Harry potter books , very well written

i got lots of forgotten realms books, the icewind dales and avatar trilogys being my favourites.

Star Wars i read anything Star Wars

a while back i was a massive 2000AD fan especially Judge Dredd, Rogue Trooper & Bad Company.

Nice Thread Veg.

Ps Also the Exiles Saga by Julian May , very awesome set

fathersquid
05-14-2008, 10:01 PM
Hmmm.... I don't know i there is any way possible I could ever have a favorite book... I've always read and somehow or other thought it was a good idea to make a career out of it (I teach English literature to junior high / high school students - and did my Masters in Adolescent literacy).

Every day I probably have new favorite books, but some always seem to resonate a bit more than others.

Fantasy/Sci-Fi - Would probably have to go with the aforementioned Good Omens, Harry Potter series, and Tolkien, but would also recommend the Wild Cards series and Thieves World series to anyone at any time.

Horror - Was a big fan of Clive Barker's Books of Blood, as well as some of his other writing (Great & Secret Show, Weaveworld), also liked the Dark Tower series.

Classic Literature - Would have to recommend Catcher in the Rye (I am Holden Caulfield), Of Mice & Men, almost any Shakespeare, Walden by Thoreau.

Modern Writers - Any Neil Gaiman, The Life of Pi by Yann Martel, Famous Last Words - Timothy Findley, Stiff by Mary Roach, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard, any writing by David Quammen.

Mystery - Nothing beats the Sherlock Holmes stories, although I also enjoyed most of Agatha Christie, and I believe it was Ellis Peters (Brother Cadfael).

I'd also recommend certain Graphic Novels to anyone - Maus is a must read, and Pride of Baghdad was probably the best comic story told last year in my mind. And as a totally different genre, Nick Bantock's books are an adventure in themselves, but I'm not sure if I would actually call them traditional writing....

That is only scratching the surface, I'm sure I'll remember others later... I look forward to hearing what everyone else reads. And if anyone wants more detail / description of any of these books I've mentioned, or suggestions in other areas of things you may not have considered before, just ask.

golem
05-15-2008, 02:17 PM
I have one Magic the gathering novel -> never finished it so I never bought any others.

Star Wars books depend very much on the author involved. I will recommend Timothy Zahn (all books), RA Salvatore and also the X-wing novels (not sure who wrote those). Oh I Jedi is also good.

Wild cards -> I have read the first book and it was very good but somehow I never got around to reading the others..

fathersquid
05-15-2008, 09:29 PM
Wild cards -> I have read the first book and it was very good but somehow I never got around to reading the others..

There's probably close to twenty of them now... a bit of reading to catch up :)

golem
05-16-2008, 01:28 AM
hmm that's nice :D
Don't have too much to do here anyway.. except for playing TQ/IT

Steerpike
05-16-2008, 11:03 AM
"Also seen some people talk about Tolkien.. Well, I never read the Lord of the Rings, because I absolutely hated the Hobbit. Nothing exciting happened in that book, and the writing style was quite bad.
Also read a small part of the Silmarillion, but ... Well, that book is the devil. It's HORRIBLE. It's like reading the bible, only 10 times more boring and longwinded."

The Silmarillion is just that - the Bible for Middle Earth. I have read all of it (read everything by Tolkein), but would only recommend it to people who (a) like classical mythology (and I mean the unfriendly versions they used to publish, not the Myth-Lyte versions you can get nowadays) or (b) love Tolkein.

fathersquid
05-16-2008, 11:18 AM
And with a name like Steerpike, you must recommend the Gormenghast books to others... at least I'd assume you would?

Ivaron
05-16-2008, 01:44 PM
The Silmarillion is just that - the Bible for Middle Earth. I have read all of it (read everything by Tolkein), but would only recommend it to people who (a) like classical mythology (and I mean the unfriendly versions they used to publish, not the Myth-Lyte versions you can get nowadays) or (b) love Tolkein.
Right, I thought so.
How about The Lord of the Rings, though? Is the writing style similar to The Hobbit? I've heard it's quite longwinded, which is one of the reasons I never tried the books. And having already seen the movies, I'm afraid it won't be much fun if you already know what's gonna happen..

golem
05-16-2008, 01:45 PM
The hobbit was good. Lord of the Rings was ok but I always have some ups and downs when reading that (it's too long).
i tried another book by Tolkien once and that went back to the library unfinished.

tim
05-17-2008, 02:36 PM
A book I've never read but always wanted to due to the rave reviews everyone always gives it is '1984'. I think I may have to make a trip to the local library tomorrow and sit in the park.

ward_rb
05-17-2008, 02:59 PM
A book I've never read but always wanted to due to the rave reviews everyone always gives it is '1984'. I think I may have to make a trip to the local library tomorrow and sit in the park.

the story is great, but the writing can get pretty dry. id still recommend it though.

Roland
05-17-2008, 10:10 PM
Because I have countless "favorites" I guess I can start anywhere heh ;)

Read this in High School and the subsequent 2nd and 3rd books that made up the series at the time (now there's 5 total)

Fantastic story. A bit Fallout (pc game), a bit Logan's Run (book/movie) with a dash of Shogun (book/movie) and Oriental Fantasy to complete the mix!

GREAT BOOKS!

If you can find them, buy them ;)

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/l/eric-van-lustbader/sunset-warrior.htm

Eric Van Lustbader - The Sunset Warrior

http://www.amazon.com/Sunset-Warrior-Eric-Van-Lustbader/dp/0345466780

http://www.amazon.com/Shallows-Night-Eric-Van-Lustbader/dp/0345466802/ref=pd_bxgy_b_text_b/104-7012460-3886324

http://www.amazon.com/Dai-San-Eric-Van-Lustbader/dp/0345466756/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_b

:)

GWarrior
05-18-2008, 07:01 AM
Also for me the Deathlands series , althought they killed it movie wise and the Survivalist series was good too

minisav
05-18-2008, 08:27 AM
6 Books just been ordered. All out of my favourite set of books.

Maximum Ride: The Final Warning - James Patterson (Amazing)
3 Jimmy Coates books by Joe Craig
Superior Saturday - Garth Nix (44 days :D)
CHERUB: The General - Robert Muchamore

I can't wait! :)

Steerpike
05-20-2008, 07:11 AM
And with a name like Steerpike, you must recommend the Gormenghast books to others... at least I'd assume you would?

Yes, particularly the first two books, Titus Groan and Gormenghast. I'm not so keen on the third book, Titus Alone (perhaps because Steerpike isn't in it). Mervyn Peake is one of my favourite authors (I don't have an absolute favourite, as I read a range of genres.)

If pushed to choose one book to take with me to that desert island, though, I would choose the Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio (in translation, as my mediaeval Italian isn't up to much), which shows that humour is pretty much eternal.

Strongfok
05-20-2008, 10:57 AM
I have too many to list but the most memorables are:

CS Lewis (Narnia Crhonicles)
Tom Clancy (Ryan Series)
Michael Connely (Bosch Series)
Lee Child (Reacher Series)
Robert Crais (Pike & Elvis Series)

I did read the Anne Rice (Vampire) series, most of the Stephen King and Dean Koontz books, John Darnton (specially Neanderthal). I also get a lot of first time author's books and other stuff from the clubs I belong to at MurderByTheBook. Looking into Laurell Hamilton vampire series.....

golem
05-20-2008, 02:10 PM
If pushed to choose one book to take with me to that desert island,

In that case I think I'd take either a bible or a single bound Lord of the Rings..

Either of those would seem to be the best supply of paper to last me a while ;)

fathersquid
05-20-2008, 03:41 PM
Yes, particularly the first two books, Titus Groan and Gormenghast. I'm not so keen on the third book, Titus Alone (perhaps because Steerpike isn't in it). Mervyn Peake is one of my favourite authors (I don't have an absolute favourite, as I read a range of genres.)

If pushed to choose one book to take with me to that desert island, though, I would choose the Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio (in translation, as my mediaeval Italian isn't up to much), which shows that humour is pretty much eternal.

If only Peake and lived long enough to finish the series the way he had intended... but you have me on the second book - I know nothing of that one, so I'll have to look it up - but my medieval Italian isn't that good either :) so I guess I'll be looking for a translation as well...

As an aside... My most recent order of books arrived today... don't know if they'll make a favorite list but they are:
Natural Acts - A Sidelong View of Science & Nature by David Quammen
Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science & Sex by Mary Roach
Fatal Revenant by Stephen Donaldson
and
Inside Straight by George R. R. Martin

Now if only summer would hurry up and get here so I don't have to English but have time to read...

psisci
05-28-2008, 08:39 AM
I have a love/hate relationship with the Wheel of Time series. I really liked the first book. But I hate Nynaeve and the fact that very few actually happens in each book after the first. Issues are unresolved, it takes 2-3 books for people to travel somewhere, etc, etc..
On the other hand, I really like the story it has, and Mat Cauthon is maybe my favorite fictional character ever. Rhand annoys me sometimes, being so stubborn and acting all tough, but he's also a sad and complex character.
I'm looking forward to the last book, because I want to know how it ends, and than I won't have to read that damn series anymore xD

it is good to know i'm not the only one reading the wheel of time, what a relive :cry:
but my fovorits ( well there is more but.... ) are
"The Beligard" Series and "The Mollarian" series by David Eddings
the hyperion cantos by dan simmons. :D
:eek: there is another one, but i'm not sure if it is i English , just a minute....
damn, it seems it is still haven't been translated into English.
here is a link (http://www.nimrodharel.co.il/eng/) to the writer homepage, his book is a sci/fi about preception and the connection between body/mind/reality :cool:

Steerpike
05-28-2008, 09:11 AM
If only Peake and lived long enough to finish the series the way he had intended... but you have me on the second book - I know nothing of that one, so I'll have to look it up - but my medieval Italian isn't that good either :) so I guess I'll be looking for a translation as well...



If you do look for a translation, look for one post-1950. As a lot of the humour is sexual in nature, more prudish translators tended to change things quite a lot. In fact, until recently, one of the stories was dropped altogether because it was considered too near the knuckle. I read the Penguin Classics version, which was very enjoyable, and had a good introduction and notes.

that said, recently I haven't been reading such "highbrow" stuff - I'm re-reading the Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser stories by Fritz Lieber, and really enjoying them.

F4rmerbob
05-31-2008, 01:35 PM
I just noticed this thread :P

Alright, Keeping to just Dead-Tree black ink on white paper...

Fantasy:
J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings/The Hobbit - I had read the hobbit 5 times by the time I was 10, and the Lord of the Rings 3 times. I guess I was a bit obsessive there, but it is a good series. I have never finished the Silmarillion
Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series - I have read the entire series again every time a new book comes out... since book 4. It is a bit slow in progressing the plot, but I find it enjoyable and Robert Jordan was a master of description.
George R.R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire - Another top quality series. It is quite long, but George R.R. Martin can write plot twists extremely well, as he isn't afraid of killing a main character. Its a very dark series, and it is nowhere near finished.
CS Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia - Enjoyable, but its been a while since I've read them.
Phillip J. Pullman's His Dark Materials - the Atheist's answer to the Chronicles of Narnia.
Terry Pratchett's Diskworld - Awesome quality. I haven't read most of the books, but I'm working on it. Its a shame he has Alzheimer's.

R.A. Salvador's Drizz't series - I read the Dark Elf trilogy recently and thought that they were rather poorly written. I remember liking his Star Wars books, but that was a long time ago.

Sci-Fantasy:
Timothy Zahn - Really fun to read, mostly well written books. His Star Wars series is great, and the first Star Wars books I read (and GAT is pure awesome, should have been in the prequel trilogy). Other series by him: The Conquerer Saga, about a human vs alien war started by a misunderstanding (of course, not the most original plot start). The Cobra Trilogy: Super soldiers in a different human vs alien conflict, but with less war and more politics. This series is closer to Hard Sci-Fi, and has more of the strategic counter-thinking, that is common in Hard Sci-Fi, than in his other books.
Other Star Wars books: The X-Wing series is good, and some of the other series, but some of them are really bad. Its been a while since I've read any though.
Julian May's Saga of Pliocene Exile - I doubt any of you have heard of this. Its about a group of humans in the future who are sick of the current situation of the human race and elect to take a one-way ticket back in time to the Pliocene era, where an alien race enslaves them. Includes Psychic powers and lots of politics.
David Weber's books Most of his books are on the border of Sci-Fantasy and Hard Sci-Fi, but I prefer to keep the definition of Hard Sci-Fi rather strict. I really like his Honor Harrington series. The series is Wheel of Time long (and of course not complete), and is pretty close to Hard Sci-Fi. The plot is basically Horatio Hornblower INSPACE (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecycledInSPACE?from=Main.INSPACE) (and if you start reading that website I've cursed you to an eternity in front of your computer muhwahahahaha), which is a good basis for a plot. His detailed battle descriptions are extremely detailed, and only occasionally does he get his math wrong (yea, math :P), and he tends to long sequences of plot exposition, most of which is possible to skip similar to the Robert Jordan detailed descriptions. I would say that he is pretty good about writing outstanding characters and situations, but he has a tendency to write the same and similar characters in every series, with Alicia DeVries from the Fury series being a very clear prototype of Honor Harrington. The worst about this is the Multiverse series, where (I have only read the first book) he very clearly needed an editor to reign him in (I would say to the point of rewriting half the plot), but it is still entertaining can'tputitdown reading. Incidentally all of his books are available free online in the Baen Free Library.
John Ringo - One of the better military science fiction writers (Tom Clancy similar, but more INSPACE (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecycledInSPACE?from=Main.INSPACE), his books are nicely action packed. I have noticed that he tends to have characters occasionally blurt out his own politics and opinions pretty much out of nowhere, which I find extremely annoying. For example, in Ghost (which is not INSPACE), he pretty much has the main character, in a thought monologue common to the genre, pretty much state "Bush is awesome and his policies are spot on" out of the blue. I'm not criticizing his politics here (this example was chosen because it obviously stands out), but this kind of thing is REALLY annoying. He could have easily (and the plot even allowed for it) been subtle and create an obvious Bush analogue and have his policies work (angel trumpet sounds, crowds line the street throwing flowers, free love, total deregulation, etc. Ok I'm criticizing now.). I've noticed a number of other authors in the military sci-fi genre do the same, and its just bad writing and is one of the very few things that will absolutely break my suspension of disbelief (as it specifically calls attention to things that are not in the story). Otherwise John Ringo's books are entertaining (warning: graphic sexual content, including BDSM and rape)
Michael Z. Williamson' Better to Beg Forgiveness - Similar to John Ringo's books, Michael Z. Williamson also writes a good political drama. He also has the insert politics and opinions problem.
Douglas Adams' Hitchhiker Guide to the Galaxy Don't Panic and bring a towel.

Dan Brown - I can't believe he's popular. His writing and plot are terrible. When I was reading the DaVinci Code he was so predictable, with massive use of Chekhov's Gun (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ChekhovsGun) (yea that website again :P) that I was able to predict every plot twist in the second half of the book at least 5 plot twists in advance. The only thing good I can say about the book was that it was actually readable and hard to put down. His other books made me want to throw up though, and I've never finished any of them.

Hard Sci-Fi
Issac Asimov's Robot and Foundation novels and short stories I love these books. I Robot is one of the best short story novels ever written, and some of his other short stories are genius. If you enjoy Sci-Fi and have not read Issac Asimov, you are really missing out. The Foundation series was written well before computers, so you may be put off by the galactic empire with powerful warships run by... slide rule. Great author
The Mote in God's Eye and The Gripping Hand by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle Both authors individually are excellent, but this series is the best series about first contact ever written, and these two authors have written a number of top quality first contact stories. It has very original aliens that definitely think differently than we do, and massive amounts of counter-thinking from very little details. Also, bonus points if you can use "on the gripping hand" in conversation.
Larry Niven's Known Space Excellent series of books, now by multiple authors. There are many original aliens in the series (I'm not quite sure about the Kzin being the first cat-race in fiction, but they definitely popularized it), and many many Hard Sci-Fi situations.
Sir Arthur C. Clarke Another excellent Sci-Fi writer. 2001, Rama, and more. I found Childhood's End extremely depressing.
Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game If you haven't read this you are seriously missing out. I really don't understand how the person who wrote this book, its sequels, and other novels, is the same person who writes non-fiction under this name.


There are tons more authors that I read, but I don't feel like writing more right now :P

golem
05-31-2008, 04:20 PM
RR Martin right.. that was a long time ago but it WAS greatly written. The deaths of main characters were really upsetting to me there :D

But the question was -> what's your favorite?
haha..

Pratchett has Alzheimers? :( oh man that really sucks.

F4rmerbob
05-31-2008, 04:25 PM
But the question was -> what's your favorite?
haha...

I got a bit off track....

I'm going to go with Lord of the Rings for historical and sentimental value. Many other books I like would not exist without it.

Steerpike
06-03-2008, 11:15 AM
Pratchett has Alzheimers? :( oh man that really sucks.

I believe he termed it an embuggrance, himself.

CAP007
06-03-2008, 11:28 AM
Well Like so many of you too meny to list but some of my favorites are:
Lord of The Rings
Wheel of Time Robert Jordan
Sword of truth Terry Goodkind
Once and future King T H White
Belgariad and Mallorien David Eddings
The whole Star wars series
Three musketeers Alaxandar Dumas
Enders Game
Battlefield Earth
Temerrare(sp?) series Naomi Novik
The whole Jack Ryan Series Tom Clancy

The Envenomed Kiss
08-21-2008, 01:46 AM
A.) How the eff do you read 3 books in a week?
B.) My favorite book ... hmm Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition "The Aeneid" by Virgil or Dante's "Inferno", "Purgatorio", & "Paradisio"

The Fallen One
08-21-2008, 10:10 PM
A.) How the eff do you read 3 books in a week?
B.) My favorite book ... hmm Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition "The Aeneid" by Virgil or Dante's "Inferno", "Purgatorio", & "Paradisio"

I can read the entire Harry Potter series in 2 days tops, though I'm not the biggest fan of the series. It ended with a cliche.

I have read and enjoy reading:

The Keys to the Kingdom - Series
The Great Tree of Avalon - Trilogy
The Lost Years of Merlin (prequel to Avalon) - Series
Abhorsen - Trilogy
Warriors - Series
Redwall - Series, though only 2 books from it

And that's it. For now. :headbang:

The Envenomed Kiss
08-22-2008, 02:18 AM
It takes me about a month to read a good book

The Fallen One
08-22-2008, 09:36 AM
It takes me about a month to read a good book

It only takes a few hours for me. The only exception is the Lord of the Rings trilogy. That stuff is thick and hard to read. :knockout:

dmspen
08-29-2008, 02:27 PM
Did anyone catch the Harry Dresden files on the SciFi channel? Read the books (10 of 'em so far) by Jim Butcher. They are very good. I'm now reading the Alera Code by Butcher and they are very good also.

My fave all time is still probably The Bourne Identity.

If you're looking for a little different fantasy/SciFi, try the Recluce books by Modesitt (13 books). SciFi based turned fantasy. White is bad and black is good in the sense that white is chaos/entropy and black is order.

I made the boast the other day that I read about 40-50 books a year. My wife scoffed. I counted what I had read the last year and it was 63, so I guess I was wrong! It's kind of a drag to read so fast. Books go away quickly and it's hard to find something good to read.

minisav
08-29-2008, 02:35 PM
I tried to read the Bourne Identity. As muchas I loved the movie I probably should have read this first.

The Fallen One
08-30-2008, 03:33 PM
I forgot the series "The Underland Chronicles."

Lady Quailsong
09-12-2008, 05:29 PM
Oh...a good book? oh yessssssssss.....and HIGHLY recommended to any of the ladies *evil grins*.
Read The Black Jewels Trilogy by Anne Bishop and The Sleeping Beauty series by Anne R. (Anne Rice).
You'll have wet dreams for months!

*purrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr*
meow

CAP007
09-14-2008, 05:24 PM
Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan

Cardboard Book
04-11-2009, 01:23 PM
My favourite set of books is the Saga of Darren Shan by Darren Shan. OK, it can be a bit childish in its target audience, but I love the story line behind it and it's one of the few books that I enjoy.

coolalien
04-11-2009, 01:27 PM
Dead Beat by Jim Butcher is the most awesome book in the Dresden Files. Nothin like riding a reanimated skeleton and kicking some necromancer *** coupled with a few plot twists and lots of humor.

BlueNinja
05-04-2009, 10:58 PM
Wow ... so many good books I've read over my lifetime. Where do I start?

I think I'll have to start with Roger Zelazny's Chronicles of Amber, a series which I have read in its entirety at least twenty times in my life. Epic fantasy where there is no good guys. :)
I have to plug a friend of mine who I knew before she got novels published, Kat Richardson. Her Greywalker series is going to have the fourth book out soon, and she promised to write me into the fifth book and then kill me. :D
One of my big favorites when I was in high school was Anne McCaffrey's Pern series, though I admit I haven't much touched them since then.
If anyone hasn't read Robert Aspirin, I recommend both the Myth Inc. and Phule's Company, especially the second one.
Jim Butcher is an excellent writer, in both his Dresden Files and Furies of Calderon series. Definately make sure, if you read the Dresden series, that you pick up the short stories in collections like "My Big Fat Supernatural Wedding" and "Mean Streets."
Asimov's robot novels were recommended, but I'd like to expand on that. Roger MacBride Allen did a trilogy of Asimov robot novels titled Caliban, Inferno, and Utopia. I think they are excellent and a worthy successor to Asimov's work. Mark Tiedermann did a trilogy as well, but only the first book Mirage is worth reading IMO.
I used to like Laurell K. Hamilton's Anita Blake series. If you decide to read them, I recommend stopping after reading book 9, because book 10 turns the series from the "supernatural thriller" plot into "supernatural porn scenes" plot. That is, starting with book 10, there isn't a plot, just loosely connected sex-with-vampires-and-wereanimals scenes.
Michael Stackpole did a stand-alone book called Once a Hero that is one of the best single novels I've ever read. I'm not sure if I want him to write a sequel to it or not. :)
Tanya Huff is a good author as well. Her Victoria Nelson and Smoke books are good urban fantasy, but I like her Confederation (aka Valor) novels better.
Someone mentioned Naomi Novik's Temeraire series, which I just started reading the third book of this morning. I think it's very good, and it is so nice to see alternate history that doesn't focus on the World Wars or the US Civil War as the only focal point in history.
I'm sure, if I had my library out instead of boxed up and ready to move, that I could triple (or more) the length of this post, but I'll stop here.

coolalien
05-05-2009, 10:30 PM
I saw McCaffrey in there! I read here book "Nimisha's Ship". That was a very interesting book. It was impressive to say the least. I'll need to start reading more of her books.

BlueNinja
05-06-2009, 03:13 PM
Because they're fun (and highly accurate!) may I present some quick book synopsis by cover:

part 1 (http://mightygodking.com/index.php/2008/10/20/mgk-versus-his-adolescent-reading-habits)
part 2 (http://mightygodking.com/index.php/2008/10/21/mgk-versus-his-adolescent-reading-habits-part-two/)
part 3 (http://mightygodking.com/index.php/2008/11/03/mgk-versus-his-adolescent-reading-habits-part-the-last/)

Scarecrow
05-06-2009, 10:44 PM
Just finished reading "The Gospel of the Flying Spaghetti Monster" by Bobby Henderson.
Not exactly a literary masterpiece, but it did provide me with a laugh or two.
http://www.venganza.org/worship/fsm-book/

Tigrul
05-09-2009, 05:06 AM
My favourite book... It's really difficult to choose only one.

I have liked all of the books with Asian subject written by James Clavell:

Tai-pan
The noble house
Shogun

He wrote other books with Asian subject which I haven't read yet, unfortunately. Gai-jin is scheduled for reading as soon as it ships from Amazon. :)

Roland
05-20-2009, 06:10 PM
Garden's of the Moon by Steven Erikson...by far the best books/series I've ever read, and I've read my share over the years ;)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gardens_of_the_Moon

:rockon:

Haktar
06-06-2009, 07:18 AM
Too hard to choose...

Sci-fi: Robert Heinlein and Frank Herbert (the best but not the only). And Harry Harrison. And Douglas Adams. And Arthur Clarke. And Gene... oh... Dan Simmons. And... and...

Fantasy: J. R. R. Tolkien and G. R. R. Martin (well, at least until I read Erikson ;)), with Robert Howard's Conan as some kiddish affection (I'm not talking all those would-be followers here) - "Beyond the Black River" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beyond_the_Black_River) being the best for me.

Talking of some traditional "serious" books, I admire John Fowles, especially "The Collector", "The Magus" and "The French Lieutenant's Woman".

demilich
07-20-2009, 06:22 AM
It is not just hard it is impossible to name only 1 book to be my favourite, but I'll try to enlist few here, what I really enjoyed reading. Please bear it in mind that I've read the Hungarian translation of most of these books.

Some classical 1st:

George Orwell: 1984, Animal Farm
Ernest Hemingway: For Whom the Bell Tolls
Ernest Hemingway: A Farewell to Arms
Robert Merle: Malevil
Robert Merle: The Virtility Factor
James Clavell: Shogun (far better then Tai-pan)

Some Sci-Fi and Fantasy:

Robert A. Heinlein: Starship Troopers
William King: Felix and Gotrek series
Dan Abnett: Gaunt's Ghosts series

veggieboy
07-20-2009, 05:16 PM
Hello Old thread of mine :)

I would like to add that reading Tragedies by the Three Great Tragedians are something I love to do. (Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides)

Tartan Waft Esquire
08-18-2009, 09:37 PM
Galatians

Alek_tq
08-20-2009, 10:38 AM
Hello Old thread of mine :)

I would like to add that reading Tragedies by the Three Great Tragedians are something I love to do. (Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides)


What was the name of my favorite.. My brain is frozen, I think it was Electra or something. It was great.


Also, necro much?

Roland
08-20-2009, 01:10 PM
Some threads never die...they just sleep lightly, awaiting the unsuspecting to come a knocking. And the cycle begins again ;)

minisav
08-21-2009, 05:57 PM
Currently reading Wuthering Heights and Callisto by Torsten Krol. Apparently a modern day Catch 22.

veggieboy
08-30-2009, 09:48 AM
You know how lame I am? I didn't read Catch 22 till up until a year ago.


I'm currently reading the Crucible, a play. I read it for a ninth grade American Literature class... I enjoy reading it. Aren't I lame?



And in response to this thread being Necroed, I had it officially stickied via the almighty awesomeness of Gene. I had the Favorite Author thread stickied as well :)

minisav
08-30-2009, 02:46 PM
I still haven't read Catch 22 either...

veggieboy
08-30-2009, 08:57 PM
Well you nee to get read it. Its an extremely good read.

juliaanthen
11-03-2010, 03:49 AM
Mine favourite books are,

College Weekend
Truth or Dare
All-Night Party
The Best Friend 2
The Face
Cat
Dead End